Ireland

Global sanctions guide

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Isle of Man
  1. Does Ireland have a sanctions regime in place?

Yes.

  1. Does Ireland implement UN sanctions?

Yes. Ireland is a member of the European Union, which implements UN sanctions in all member states by way of directly effective regulations.

  1. Does Ireland implement an autonomous sanctions regime?

No.

  1. What is the nature of the sanctions regime in Ireland?

Ireland follows the restrictive measures laid down by the UN, the EU and other international organisations which are binding on Ireland.

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is responsible for foreign policy and representing Ireland internationally. In the context of sanctions, this involves engaging with the relevant bodies at the UN and the EU, and ensuring information is shared with the appropriate government departments and agencies in Ireland.

  1. Does Ireland maintain a list of sanctioned individuals and entities?

Yes. The Garda (Police) National Immigration Bureau maintains a database containing information about individuals subject to travel sanctions. As well, the Central Bank of Ireland has access to the EU consolidated list and a UN Sanctions Committees list relating to terrorism.

  1. Are there any other lists related to sanctions?

No.

  1. Does Ireland have a licensing or authorisation system in place?

Yes. The Export Licensing Unit (part of the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation) is responsible for export controls on dual-use items, military items and items that are destined for sanctioned countries. The Control of Exports Act 2008 places controls on the export of such prohibited goods, including, in some cases, the requirement to obtain a licence.

  1. What are the consequences for a breach of sanctions in Ireland?

Trade Sanctions

The consequences for a breach of the Control of Exports Act 2008 are:

  • on summary conviction, a fine of up to €5,000 and/or imprisonment for up to 6 months
  • on conviction on indictment, a fine of up to €10,000,000 or 3 times the market value of the goods exported, and/or imprisonment for up to 5 years

Financial Sanctions

The consequences for a breach of the statutory instruments which transpose EU financial sanctions into Irish law are:

  • on summary conviction, a fine of up to €5,000, and/or imprisonment for up to 12 months
  • on conviction on indictment, a fine of up to €500,000 and/or imprisonment for up to 3 years
  1. Who are the relevant regulators in Ireland and what are their contact details?

The Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation is entirely responsible for the implementation of trade sanctions.

Licensing Unit
Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation
23 Kildare Street
Dublin
2D02 TD30
Ireland

T: (+353) 1 631 2328
E: exportcontrol@djei.ie
www.djei.ie

The Department of Finance is nominally responsible for financial sanctions, although these responsibilities are handled by the Central Bank of Ireland.

Central Bank of Ireland
PO Box 559
Dame Street
Dublin 2
D02 P656
Ireland

T: (+353) 1 224 5214
E: sanctions@centralbank.ie
http://www.financialregulator.ie

 

Contributor law firm

Chris Martin, Eversheds, One Earlsfort Centre, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2, Ireland

T: (+353) 1 6644 200
F: (+353) 1 6644 300
chrismartin@eversheds.ie
http://www.eversheds.com